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theatlantic:

The Subversive Awkwardness of Four Weddings and a Funeral

The story of Four Weddings and a Funeral’s success is about as likable as the movie itself: With a name that sounds like a working title the producers forgot to change, the low-budget tale of a bumbling bachelor somehow broke the box office, made an overnight international star out of Hugh Grant, and earned a Best Picture nomination.
How did a film (in U.S. wide release 20 years ago this week) shot over one month for four million dollars end up grossing more money than any British film made before it? The answer may lie in the movie’s refreshing take on romance. In an era of glossy erotic dramas ruling the box office (Basic Instinct, Indecent Proposal, Sliver etc.) filmgoers were apparently ready to watch a bunch of awkward British patricians attempt, and usually fail, to navigate sex and love. Grant’s endearing Charles at one point even mutters to Andie MacDowell’s Carrie, “Oh God, for a minute there I thought I was in Fatal Attraction.”
From the first, expletive-laden line (“Oh fuck, fuck fuck… fuck”) in Richard Curtis’s screenplay, the British sitcom writer immediately lets you know that he’s not telling another tale of the quietly restrained customs and code of the British aristocracy. In his high society the affluent are self-deprecating and foul-mouthed—the most repeated words in the movie are “fuck” and “splendid.”
Read more. [Image: MGM]
Jul 25, 2014 / 154 notes

theatlantic:

The Subversive Awkwardness of Four Weddings and a Funeral

The story of Four Weddings and a Funeral’s success is about as likable as the movie itself: With a name that sounds like a working title the producers forgot to change, the low-budget tale of a bumbling bachelor somehow broke the box office, made an overnight international star out of Hugh Grant, and earned a Best Picture nomination.

How did a film (in U.S. wide release 20 years ago this week) shot over one month for four million dollars end up grossing more money than any British film made before it? The answer may lie in the movie’s refreshing take on romance. In an era of glossy erotic dramas ruling the box office (Basic Instinct, Indecent Proposal, Sliver etc.) filmgoers were apparently ready to watch a bunch of awkward British patricians attempt, and usually fail, to navigate sex and love. Grant’s endearing Charles at one point even mutters to Andie MacDowell’s Carrie, “Oh God, for a minute there I thought I was in Fatal Attraction.

From the first, expletive-laden line (“Oh fuck, fuck fuck… fuck”) in Richard Curtis’s screenplay, the British sitcom writer immediately lets you know that he’s not telling another tale of the quietly restrained customs and code of the British aristocracy. In his high society the affluent are self-deprecating and foul-mouthed—the most repeated words in the movie are “fuck” and “splendid.”

Read more. [Image: MGM]

Jul 25, 2014 / 300 notes
Jul 25, 2014 / 8,833 notes

jacksgap:

So then a new video. I’ll start by saying that posting this video is probably the hardest decision i’ve ever made in terms of sharing content publicly. Parts of my life are very public whilst others remain private. My relationship with Ella lives in the private part of my life and has done for a little over two years now. Last christmas Ella went away travelling. She had planned to go for six months. This would be the longest we’ve ever been apart. 3 months in and on the run up to Ella’s birthday we were struggling. Copious amounts of Skype calls, texts and handwritten letters later we were finding the distance hard. During a Skype call Ella jokily challenged me to travel out to Australia and see her. I had a little money saved and some spare time so I decided to do it and arrive in time for her birthday. I filmed my journey as a way of showing her the process and sharing the story with friends and family. I had absolutely no intention of sharing it publicly. My fear of sharing experiences like this is that it would in some way commercialise our relationship. The emotions and actions in this film are deeply personal ones and I would hate to think that by capturing and sharing that it would somehow devalue those feelings. When I cut the film together I showed it to a few close friends and to my surprise more often then not it made them cry. I didn’t imagine it would have this impact however the filmmaker inside of me found it very satisfying. This video is and will remain very personal to me and for that reason it feels strange to share it with such a large amount of people. It took me six months to make the decision and i’m still not sure whether it was a good one or not… Importantly Ella feels very comfortable with it which was my main concern. Beyond that if other people watching the video feel a similar emotion to the one I felt whilst making it and to the one my friends felt whilst watching it then i’m a happy man. 

Jul 25, 2014 / 1,756 notes

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message ‘He is Dead’.
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,
My working week and my Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought that love would last forever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now; put out every one,
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun,
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood; For nothing now can ever come to any good.

W.H. Auden (via q-dot)
Jul 25, 2014 / 89 notes